Music television

Page 8 of 11 Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Thu Jun 19, 2014 6:32 am

Rihanna 777
7 gigs in 7 countries in 7 days, to mark her 7th album (hands up if you can name it without looking) in 7 years, on a Boeing 777. Those countries were Mexico, Canada, Sweden, France, Germany, England and the USA (and we saw footage of a different song from each gig). The sheer pressure involved in such a large compressed exercise did tell at times, but apart from a tedious sub-plot with one of her entourage doing wacky things like streaking on the flight, and the surprise that Nuno Bettencourt was a member of her band, this was an entertaining hour or so.

Morrissey: 25 Live
At Hollywood High School, LA, Morrissey belted out many solo hits, and a few from the Smiths, too. He managed some between-song banter, even letting some of the audience have the mic (luckily they merely expressed how awesome he was). With a new album on the way at last, this was a good time to be reacquainted with his back catalogue.


Last edited by misery guts on Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:04 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:02 am

Nikolai Znaider
From the Menuhin Festival, Gstaad, the Budapest Festival Orchestra, conducted by Ivan Fischer, perform Brahms' 'Violin Concerto En Re Majeur Op.77', on Aug 27, 2011, with Znaider on violin. A good effort.

Killing Me Softly - The Roberta Flack Story
Well-meaning, but quite boring. Dionne Warwick and Johnny Mathis were on hand to sing her praises, but there seemed rather a lot of musicologists and professors, including one from the "Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music", FFS. Despite the praise for her collegiate prowess and great singing, the narrative seemed to be a battle between criticising her for not being true to the black stereotype, and holding her up as the only match for the great Aretha Franklin. For me, it rather boiled down to the fact that she didn't actually write KMS at all.

The Lindsays Play Haydn
Still a few remaining of these, this was the String Quartet in C Major, op.54, 2, and very nice it was, too.


Last edited by misery guts on Sat Aug 02, 2014 7:59 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Thu Jun 26, 2014 11:19 am

Hollywood In Vienna
A protracted concert at the Vienna Konzert Haus with the Radio Symphony Orchestra of Vienna. They played various tunes from the flicks, spending the middle on an extended tribute to Lalo Schifrin (who was present), and had Al Jarreau singing a couple of songs I'd never heard before, too. The sections were MC's by Gedeon Burkhard, who killed his script at every opportunity. The tunes were OK, though.

Nat King Cole - Afraid Of The Dark
Long tribute doc replaying the familiar story, the NKC Trio, the racial hatred from the white community, the standard bearing but short-lived telly show, and so on. Greats like Tony Bennett, Harry Belafonte, Johnny Mathis, George Benson and Buddy Greco paid respect, the always entertaining George Schlatter had much to say, and Nat's 2nd wife Maria was on hand, too (she died back in 2012, so this must have taken a while to put together), and his various daughters. His acting career got short shrift, though, perhaps deserved. But every Christmas, his voice will be heard.

Michael Buble Meets Madison Square Garden
On Dec 3, 2008, the boring bighead belted out a few standards, and whilst claiming to be proud of his rise from humble starts, he finished claiming he had reached his peak. I wasn't that taken with his interpretations, either.

Celtic Woman: Believe
From the Fox Theatre, Atlanta, in 2011, the Irish vocal group belted out a mix of traditional, Irish and pop songs, from Bridge Over Troubled Water, to A Spaceman Came Travelling (!) One ironic highlight was a tribute to Broadway, which amounted to a total of 2 songs. But still a pleasantly melodic concert, even if the nationalism was vomit-worthy.
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sat Jun 28, 2014 8:41 am

Tchaikowsky On The Road
Valery Gergiev and the Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra do gigs around Europe, performing the cycle of 6 symphonies of the pre-eminent Russian composer, in Jan 2010. Gergiev was a typical conductor, though I was impressed at his facility and ease with other languages. A chattier show than many, with various band members commenting on both the composer and Gergiev himself.

Tina Turner: Rio '88

From the Maracana Stadium, Jan 16, Tina buttered up the crowd, and delivered a wide range of material, both her own and covers of other people. I rarely respect her gift for making a well-known song (Help!, for example) sound unique to her. And again I wonder why she's been so quiet for so long, as I said the last time I saw one of her concerts (about a year ago).


Last edited by misery guts on Sat Nov 26, 2016 11:35 am; edited 2 times in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Wed Jul 02, 2014 2:47 pm

Orchestre de Paris
Denis Matsuev bashes the piano whilst Paavo Jarvi conducts Tchaikowsky's 2nd Piano Concerto, from 2011. Matsuev also gets a couple of encores, which further demonstrate his dexterity.

Elbow @ Glastonbury
On the Pyramid Stage as the sun set. A few years and albums ago, they peaked massively. Now, they're just ordinary again.

The Best of Michael Bolton Live
An odd 3-phase show. He started with 3 of his own songs, then did a long stretch of covers, before finishing back with his own material. To give him credit, he gave a fair bash at Nessun Dorma, though whether the whole album of arias works is another question. I think he probably deserves a slightly better critical reaction, even if he does overdo the big-head routine.


Last edited by misery guts on Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:14 am; edited 2 times in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:28 am

Celtic Woman: Songs From The Heart
A show from Powerscourt House & Gardens in 2009, they again mixed the classic Irish with a few more mainstream numbers. Their violinist seems to be as popular as their singers, I notice.


Last edited by misery guts on Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:19 am; edited 4 times in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Wed Jul 09, 2014 1:27 pm

Stop and Listen
The story of the Polyphonic Choir of Ruda (which is in Italy) and their struggles to keep going when interest seems to be fading. Despite the forceful charms of their conductor Fabiana Noro, attempts to change their sound or blend it with others failed to work. However, they achieved success at the World Choir Games in 2008, so maybe fame & fortune were about to beckon. But then, this was from 2009, so who knows what happened.

The Legendary Bing Crosby
A 2009 tribute, thus including Andy Williams and with Regis Philbin, Michael Feinstein and Leonard Maltin (!), not to mention Mary & Kathryn Crosby. From going solo in 1931 and making movies from 1932, he slowly conquered the two forms for the American audience, and proved adept at musical duets to blend a vocal harmony. This was shown best in his ultimate performance with David Bowie, shortly before he died. Crosby probably doesn't get the credit he deserves, though being one of the voices of Christmas (see also Nat Cole) is better than most musicians manage.

Music Room: Julian Lloyd Webber

This 2010 series features Howard Goodall chatting to various classical music bods. Here, the cello whizz talked about his family, what drew him to the cello specifically, his efforts to popularise less familiar cello pieces, his charitable work with Venezuelan children, and his own Stradivarius' cello, formerly owned by Barjanski. Both host and guest suited the format, and JLW' performances were enjoyable, too.


Last edited by misery guts on Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:05 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Mon Jul 14, 2014 8:37 am

Celtic Woman
A comparatively early gig from the Helix Centre, Dublin in 2004. They ran through the usual mix of the poppy and the classical Gaelic. Their violin whizz did her stuff. It was all very pleasant, if derivative.

The Muses Within
A behind the scenes look at a collaborative album, The Ghosts Within, which combined the sax playing of Gilad Atzmon, the violin playing of Ros Stephen, and the idiosyncracy of Robert Wyatt. Wyatt, unsurprisingly, did most of the talking.

The Warsaw Recital
From the Warsaw Philharmonic Concert Hall, in 2010, the reliable Daniel Barenboim dashed out a wide variety of musical pieces from Chopin on the piano, from a barcarolle to a berceuse, a polonaise to a mazurka, and a fistful of waltzes too. Undeniably impressive stuff.


Last edited by misery guts on Sat Nov 26, 2016 11:35 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Thu Jul 17, 2014 6:51 am

The Shadows: The Final Tour
Lengthy 2+ hour gig from Cardiff in 2004 (so possibly not that Final). Most of their material is instrumentals, so those that do have words mix things up nicely. Surviving members Bruce Welch, drummer Brian Bennett and guitar hero Hank Marvin produced the goods, and included their big hits, some of their works with Cliff Richard, and plenty of others. Great stuff.

Katy B @ T in the Park
A surprisingly short set (or what was broadcast), just 4 songs, even if the finish was the mighty 'Lights On'.

The Nation's Favourite Motown Song
A lengthy tribute derived from a poll run by ITV, and discussed by the great and the good, from Martha Reeves, Dionne Warwick, Smokey Robinson, Holland-Dozier-Holland, Michael Bolton, Tito Jackson, and especially Paul Riser who emerged as an unsung hero of Motown. That all-important Top 20:
1 - I Heard It Through The Grapevine - Marvin Gaye
2 - What Becomes of the Brokenhearted? - Jimmy Ruffin
3 - Ain't No Mountain High Enough - Diana Ross
4 - Dancing in the Street - Martha and the Vandellas
5 - My Girl - The Temptations
6 - Tears of a Clown - Smokey Robinson and the Miracles
7 - I'll Be There - The Jackson 5
8 - Baby Love - The Supremes
9 - War - Edwin Starr
10 - Stop! In The Name of Love - The Supremes
11 - I Want You Back - The Jackson 5
12 - Reach Out, I'll Be There - The Four Tops
13 - Tracks of My Tears - Smokey Robinson and the Miracles
14 - My Guy - Mary Wells
15 - I Can't Help Myself - The Four Tops
16 - My Cherie Amour - Stevie Wonder
17 - What's Going On? - Marvin Gaye
18 - Papa Was a Rolling Stone - The Temptations
19 - Uptight (Everything's Alright) - Stevie Wonder
20 - Jimmy Mack - Martha and the Vandellas


Last edited by misery guts on Sat Nov 05, 2016 11:57 am; edited 2 times in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sun Jul 20, 2014 8:16 am

Andy Kershaw: In Confidence
BBC radio DJ and noted champion of World music talked of being blooded as a live TV presenter at Live Aid, how he formed his musical tastes, working with fellow legend DJ John Peel, and his political stance. An easy hour with a naturally voluble broadcaster.

Celebracion
From the Walt Disney Concert Hall with the LA Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Gustavo Dudamel, in 2010. They delivered some Rossi and Verdi, with help from guest tenor Juan Diego Florez. Short & sweet.

Music Room: Howard Goodall meets Lang Lang
The piano prodigy talks about early Western influences, forming views by travelling the world, honing his craft in Europe and the USA, inspiring the young and facing fresh challenges. He's clearly someone with a long and worthwhile career ahead of him still.


Last edited by misery guts on Sat Jan 21, 2017 11:40 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Wed Jul 23, 2014 2:30 pm

Greenwich Village: Music That Defined A Generation
A quite lengthy analysis of a scene that slowly changed a country, and a world. There were plenty of worthy contributors, from Don McLean and Kris Kristofferson, to Jose Feliciano and Judy Collins, from Carly Simon and Richie Havens, to Arlo Guthrie and Pete Seeger. I didn't realise Carly's early career was in an act with her sister. Much homage was paid to Seeger, to Woody Guthrie, to Bob Dylan, and others. The power of protest shone brightly through.

Britain's Most Dangerous Songs: Listen to the Banned
Neat title, huh? This hour looked at 10 cases where the BBC (usually) banned or frowned on a record for assorted reasons. The cases of the Sex Pistols and Frankie Goes To Hollywood are drearily familiar, so it was the tales of George Formby (too innuendo-friendly), the Beatles and D Mob (too pro-drugs) and Louis Armstrong (was Mack The Knife glamorising crime?) that caught the interest, as well as death discs (Leader of the Pack).

More Dangerous Songs: And the Banned Played On
Just an hour of performance of many notorious songs. The stand-outs here were again the less familiar - Gang of Four's I Love a Man in Uniform, Eliza Doolittle's Walking on Water (which I hadn't even heard, let alone heard banned), Screaming Lord Sutch's Jack The Ripper, and best of all, Tom Robinson's Glad to Be Gay, a protest song so powerful that the BBC still would do anything rather than play it. Makes you realise which of all these songs really are the most dangerous - because FGTH and the Pistols are tamely played at all hours.


Last edited by misery guts on Tue Aug 12, 2014 12:22 pm; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sat Jul 26, 2014 7:17 am

The South Bank Show Originals - Luciano Pavarotti
Remembering a 1995 chat in Pesaro, Italy, where Pavarotti lived and was treated like a hero. His father Fernando, then 82, sang but his son called him a diva. Luciano talked about the importance of protecting "the Voice", when to say No to people, being nervous and yet relaxed at the right moment. Dame Kiri te Kanawa also shared thoughts on the late, great legend.

In Confidence: Reverend Richard Coles
The other half of the Communards related how the compensation from a car accident led to his music career, and why it burned out so quickly after its peak. He felt envious of Jimmy Somerville, and had a drug-induced "lost year", before being called to the church, taking a theology degree, and his current occasional media career.

Songs of Praise: Tony Christie - My Story, My Music
How he progressed from church worship in childhood, overcoming natural shyness to become such a compelling stage performer, not to mention his belief in the help of angels. Greats like Graham Gouldman and Tim Rice sang his praises. His success with 'Amarillo' for Comic Relief was also included, and there was even time to sing a few hymns. A nice guy.


Last edited by misery guts on Sat May 23, 2015 11:30 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Mon Jul 28, 2014 11:46 am

Cheryl Cole's Hangout
The most successful solo member from Girls Aloud is back with a new single & album, which this show promoted reasonably well. She talks fondly of the band, how they pushed boundaries and earned critical acclaim, which I think is a bit optimistic. She liked working with will I am and Calvin Harris (quelle surprise) and would like to work with Dizzee Rascal (!). Her new album reflects a year spent partying and getting into club sounds. Hmm... then again, the single is #1.

The Joy of the Guitar Riff
A fun look at the riffs which changed rock, with many big-name contributors, whether Brian May or Tony Iommi, Hank Marvin or Lita Ford, Nile Rodgers or Johnny Marr, and the inevitable Dave Grohl. The 10 tracks signalled out were:
Johnny B Goode
Rumble
You Really Got Me
Black Sabbath
Bohemian Rhapsody
Smoke on the Water
Good Times
Beat It
This Charming Man
Smells Like Teen Spirit
though they did pay lip service to less familiar guitar heroes like Robert Fripp or the Pixies. And they finished by mentioning that Seven Nation Army proves there's still great riffs being found.

Great Guitar Riffs at the BBC
A showcase for many of the tracks mentioned but not discussed in the other show: so FBI, Voodoo Chile, Born To Be Wild, Paranoid Android, Rock N Roll Damnation, and so on. I'm not convinced FBI is the Shadows' greatest riff, but hey. Also not convinced by the adulation for My Bloody Valentine & that crowd either. But a good show.


Last edited by misery guts on Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:06 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sat Aug 02, 2014 7:21 am

Music Room: Howard Goodall meets Nicola Benedetti
The Italo-Scottish violin whizz talks of copying her elder sister's violin playing, but being good enough to join the Menuhin School at the age of 10, the knack of understanding different composer styles, winning Young Musician of the Year 2004, as well as performing several pieces by the likes of Ravel and Bach.

Northern Soul: Living For The Weekend
Another look at the club scene which inspired many working class people to adore the sounds from 60s Motown. The scene caught the ears of Pete Waterman, Peter Stringfellow, Tony Blackburn, and several DJs, notably Ian Levine. Two key centres were Wigan Casino and Blackpool Mecca. The problems started when the quest for new (i.e. old) material became increasingly desperate, until it ran out. There was some attempt to link it to modern tunes (inevitably, Pharrell Williams' 'Happy') but I'm not convinced about that.

Music Room: Howard Goodall meets Alison Balsom
The trumpet whizz talked of being inspired by Dizzy Gillespie, the trick to learning the sound, the desire to test people's assumptions about the trumpet, and commissioning new works to generate new interest.

Tchaikovsky - Gergiev : The Symphonies - No. 2 in C Minor
Months after seeing half of these concerts, this was one I missed, with Valery Gergiev conducting, and performed by the Mariinsky Orchestra. Good stuff as usual.


Last edited by misery guts on Fri Jan 30, 2015 10:08 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Fri Aug 08, 2014 11:13 am

Nicole Scherzinger's Hangout
The ex-PCD leader talks about meeting Miley Cyrus, working with 50 Cent, being inspired by Whitney Houston (and meeting her & Bobby Brown), being impressed by Sam Smith, and the naivety of making the first PCD video when they had no clue what they were getting into. Seems like a nice person, anyway.

BBC Proms: Richard Strauss Celebration
The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Vasily Petrenko and featuring the BBC Singers and soprano Inger Dam-Jensen, performed three tricky works by Strauss, followed by Elgar's 2nd Symphony. The Elgar took about the same time as the Strauss pieces, oddly.

Music Room: Howard Goodall meets Leid Ove-Andsnes
A Norwegian pianist, apparently. He talked of being inspired by a non-Norwegian teachers, his admiration for Russian music, needing to take a break from Greig, and the French/Polish duality of Chopin. And played a few tunes along the way, too.

Tchaikovsky - Gergiev : The Symphonies - No. 3 in D Major, op.27
The usual suspects at La Salle Pleyel again. Pleasant enough.


Last edited by misery guts on Sat Jan 03, 2015 9:24 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sun Aug 10, 2014 9:00 am

Ella Fitzgerald: Live at Montreux 1969
Back to June 22, 1969, for over an hour of magnificent music, mixing paces, the familiar and some surprising covers (Sunshine of Your Love, for example). She closed on 'A House is Not a Home'.

Cher Lloyd's Hangout
The X Factor alumnus is back with a 2nd album to talk about. She seems to have done well during a lengthy spell in the USA, and has developed a more mature sound now. Whether it works out for her will remain to be seen, given her comeback single only entered at #41, and her album was #21.

Lovebox Festival 2014
A selection of material from Chase & Status, Jess Glynne, Soul II Soul, A$AP Rocky, MIA and a few from Nas, too. Good to see something of a mix of styles (though not much).


Last edited by misery guts on Tue Jul 28, 2015 1:15 pm; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sat Aug 23, 2014 9:43 am

Music Room: Howard Goodall meets Emma Johnson
A clarinet whizz who started young, admires Lenny Bernstein and received respect from Johnny Dankworth.

BBC Proms: Ravel's Concerto for the Left Hand
Pianist Alexandre Tharaud did the honours, and there was chat about Paul Wittgenstein's legacy of left-handed compositions (see above somewhere), followed by an encore of Scriabin's 'Prelude for the Left Hand'. But the bulk of the show was the closing 5th Symphony by Mahler, which had no connection to what had come before.

BBC Proms Masterworks
The World Orchestra for Peace, conducted by Valery Gergiev, performed Strauss' Symphonic Fantasia from 'Die Frau Ohne Schatten', and then Mahler's 6th Symphony. Gergiev was interviewed beforehand to provide some elucidation. Fine for what it was.

Ryan Tedder's Hangout
The tedious One Republic frontman and songwriter to the stars talking about working with Timbaland, with Adele, with Beyoncé Knowles, with Ella Henderson, and swapping ballads for uptempo stuff and writing for Leona Lewis and Ellie Goulding. His big break was apparently winning a talent contest in 2001 connected to Lance Bass & Justin Timberlake. Such a dull person to listen to, though.
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Wed Aug 27, 2014 1:01 pm

Music Room: Howard Goodall meets Natalie Clein
It's another cello whizz, the Young Musician of the Year 1994. She started out as a violinist (like her mum), but changed to cello at the age of 6. She discussed the Jewish connection with music, authenticity of Hungarian folk tunes, and revered Casals. A fun, interesting player.

The Lady In Number 6: Music Saved My Life
The amazing true-life tale of Alice Herz-Somer, still playing piano daily at the age of 109 (!) Her family were friends with Mahler and Kafka when she was very young, in Prague. She survived the horrors of the Holocaust because she and her friend were such great pianists that the Nazis kept them alive rather than lose the pleasure. Which seems a bit romanticised, but who knows? Her son Raphael became a famous cellist, but died at a mere 64. Clearly Alice was a truly remarkable person.

The Kate Bush Story: Running Up That Hill
Tied in to her return to live gigs after 35 years, this run-through was notable for the plethora of the famous paying homage. Not merely Elton John, Peter Gabriel, David Gilmour and Tori Amos, but also Tricky, Steve Coogan, Neil Gaiman and Big Boi from OutKast. Archive footage of Kate herself in interviews and performance footage helped fill out the story.

Kate Bush at the BBC
A selection of 15 songs from assorted shows. Interesting titbits were the idea that the video for 'Experiment IV' was banned from Top Of The Pops for being too shocking. There was a nice mix of the familiar and the less so, too.

BBC Proms Masterworks: Walton & Sibelius
A fair enough bash from the National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Thomas Sondergard. They managed Walton's Violin Concerto, and Sibelius' The Swan of Tuonela, and his 5th Symphony. Not bad.
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sun Aug 31, 2014 7:32 am

Music Room: Howard Goodall meets Evelyn Glynnie
Xylophones-a-go-go, though Evelyn finishes with a complex piece involving less familiar instruments like waterphones and a vibratone. She moved on from piano at 8, to clarinet at 10, and percussion at 12. Doesn't dwell on her past performances because working "in the moment" is preferable. Able to play multiple-part pieces on her own, or on just one instrument. A legend in her own way.

The Sensual World of Kate Bush
An amiable half-hour from 1989 plugging her then-new album. She talked about her family, her dance learning, her 1979 tour (footage included) and how the radio mic was invented, her directing & storyboarding of videos (influenced by Hitchcock). Hopefully, the current buzz will yield other curios.

Vladimir Horowitz: A Reminiscence
From 1993, as his widow Wanda reflected on his life, together with footage of them interviewed together during his life. He was fixed on music from a young age, and became a globally famous piano talent. He married Wanda, who was Toscanini's daughter! He went through an ill period from 1953 to 1965 when he didn't play in public. He revered Clementi, more than Scriabin, though he met Scriabin's daughter when he eventually performed in Moscow. A quirky, different account of a fascinating life.
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Thu Sep 04, 2014 12:33 pm

BBC Proms Masterworks: 20th Century music
Edward Gardner conducted the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain as they worked through pieces by Stravinsky, Prokofiev and Lutoslawski. Louis Schwizgebel soloed on the piano during the Prokofiev. A different kettle of fish.

Nigel Kennedy: The Four Seasons by Vivaldi
With help from the English National Chamber Orchestra in 1990, and with clips of Nigel talking to Mariella Frostrup enthusiastically about the project, but the performance itself was worthy of the acclaim. Nigel and Vivaldi shared asthma difficulties, apparently. He also claimed that 'Autumn' manages to both evoke an anti-hunting message and an anti-nuclear one. Not quite so sure about that, but still great stuff.

Addicts' Symphony
Recovering alcoholic James McConnel brought together 10 addicts to rehearse together, 8 weeks before a performance alongside the London Symphony Orchestra. Their ailments varied from drugs to anxiety. Two dropped out along the way, but the rest saw it through, along with a composition they had knocked up between themselves along the way. Quite a moving and inspirational programme, actually.


Last edited by misery guts on Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:16 am; edited 2 times in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Wed Sep 10, 2014 1:01 pm

James Last: Live at the Royal Albert Hall
Over 2 hours, from Sep 12, 2007, and a mixed bag it was. Without captions, about 1/3 of the works were wasted on me, and though I was bemused at the mixture of songs (Vertigo and Wake Me Up When September Ends, alongside Love Is In The Air and Downtown), the experience left me cold. Maybe I've been spoiled by the manifest charm of Andre Rieu.

Only In Mahagonny: The Legacy
A Dublin production of the Weill/Brecht classic, a satire on the money-led society. There were some notable quirks, concerning the staging, and use of social media to extend the world of the fiction, but I'm not sure I'd have been beating down the door for tickets even if I were local.

Zahia Ziouani ou la Musique Francaise
From the Conservatoire de Stains, on Feb 17, 2010, a rare female conductress led her charges through works by Chabrier, Lalo and Saint-Saens, but the highlight, oddly placed after the interval, was Dukas' piece The Sorceror's Apprentice, world famous from Fantasia and rightly so.

The South Bank Show Originals: Iggy Pop
Recalling a 2004 show, the charming Mr Pop met Melvyn in Miami. He came across as modest, polite and courteous, embodying his humble origins, and contrasting with his ecstatic stage persona. He reflected on how the Stooges narked the hippies, but drugs were their downfall. His work with Bowie was beneficial, and his eventual solvency really brought him serenity.

Rodrigo Y Gabriela: Live at Red Rocks
From the famous Amphitheatre in Colorado, with support from the Colorado Symphony Orchestra, they ran through many varying tunes, but they put up title captions, so I'll forgive them anything.
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Sat Sep 13, 2014 7:16 am

Omnibus: Leonard Bernstein - The Art of Conducting
Apparently, modern conducting kicked off around 150 years ago, with Mendelssohn taking one approach, and Wagner taking another. This competition has remained ever since. Keeping time through beats in a bar, true tempo, the need to know every part of every line, the difficulty of practising, and so on. Certainly presented in a way to encourage even the dimmest wit to follow.

Discovering: Bing Crosby
The usual story, but the notable bits were his involvement with the development of recording facilities and techniques, without which much of the modern era would have been vastly delayed or hugely different. Whether he was motivated by money, ego, lethargy, time-management or posterity, he still made the right moves, to everyone's benefit.

Daniel Barenboim: Liszt Recital from La Scala - A Tribute to Italy
The indefatigable pianist did his best to a huge audience, and at least the tunes were captioned. From 2007.


Last edited by misery guts on Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:08 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Thu Sep 18, 2014 11:54 am

Omnibus: Leonard Bernstein on American Musical Comedy
The erstwhile conductor defines there being poles of variety and opera, with different styles inbetween to tell a story. The trend is from variety toward opera (or at least when this was made). Early origins come in a play called "The Black Crook", but once plots & lyrics come in, and European success takes things on, then things move on a-pace, and the 1920's are a boom time of a sort, before the Depression and the advent of talkies leave their dread mark. The New York public turn out to be important (huh), but then again so is Ethel Merman. He covers South Pacific, the idea of the evolved recitative, and anticipates a new dawn. Oh well.

The South Bank Show Originals: Dame Kiri te Kanawa
The 1990 show with the adopted Kiwi world class singer, who admired the style of Tuna Turner, rebelled against the stuffiness of the opera world, was made a star by her appearance at the 1981 Royal Wedding. She suffered breakdown in confidence, but returned to triumphs. Though she thought in 1990 that she hadn't long left of a career, the modern day shows her star power was far greater.

BBC Proms: West-Eastern Divan Orchestra
Conductor Daniel Barenboim brings his culturally mixed group to bear on a bit of Mozart, before a main dish of 4 Ravel numbers, climaxing with the 'Bolero'. Barenboim suggests that the Bolero is a bit bland on its own, and putting it in this context improves it. He's wrong on both counts, plus the Bolero seemed slightly hurried for some reason.

Legends: Thin Lizzy - Bad Reputation
The saga of how an Irish rock group had to tread some tricky paths to make it big, and whose line-up kept altering through one mishap or another. Scott Gorham and Brian Downey seem the most coherent surviving members. I seem to think Gary Moore was still alive when this was made, so his non-inclusion seems all the more poignant now. But not half as much as the band's slow disintegration, and the demise of Phil Lynott.


Last edited by misery guts on Fri Jan 29, 2016 8:04 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Fri Sep 26, 2014 12:27 pm

The Art of Rap: Something From Nothing
Ice T gets thoughts and history from a plethora of names, and it's pretty much anyone who is anyone: from Afrika Bambaataa and Melle Mel, through Chuck D and Eminem, to KRS-One and Kool Moe Dee, and finally Rev Run & DMC, Dr Dre, Ice Cube and Snoop Dogg. It really became a case of "well, will he get so-&-so? bloody hell, he has!" I've a lot of time for Ice T, and this was a really great film.

UB40: Live at Montreux 2002
A lengthy concert mixing the familiar and some from their then-latest album Cover Up. They've had line-up changes in recent years, but given their recent reformation, this was a timely showcase, from July 19 at the Stravinski Auditorium. Their encore was Cherry Oh Baby and Many Rivers To Cross.

Omnibus: Leonard Bernstein on The Music of JS Bach
Another in this classic series. Bach was discovered by Mendelssohn. Bernstein set out to win over the reluctant, talking about the use of Counter-Point, the use of horizontal & vertical melody lines, the improved Chorale style and so on. After looking at many different Bach pieces, he focussed most on his "St Matthew's Passion". Bach apparently was keen on mystical ideas, numerology & so on, which was good enough for me.


Last edited by misery guts on Wed Jun 03, 2015 9:37 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  misery guts on Thu Oct 02, 2014 12:45 pm

BBC Proms Masterworks: Mahler & Adams
The BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Marin Alsop, worked through John Adams' "Short Ride in a Fast Machine" and "Saxophone Concerto", and the rather longer 1st Symphony by Mahler. Some behind-the-scenes chatter to help fill out the run-time, too.

The Frost Interview - Daniel Barenboim
Possibly one of Frost's last interviews for RT from 2013, with the genius conductor. It really filled in his background for me, his marriage with Jacqueline du Pre, his own musical journey, how he feels about the Middle East Crisis as a Jew, the foundation of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, and so on. He's had his brushes with controversy as a result, but remains unrepentant and feels music should transcend narrow concerns. Really enjoyed this.

Omnibus: Leonard Bernstein- What Makes Opera Grand?
At the Metropolitan Opera House in New York, Bernstein tried to explain that opera appeals more directly to emotion, has more instant effects. He used Act 3 of Puccini's "La Boheme" to compare how the operatic narrative scores over a straight play-reading (Jean Marsh featured in the "straight" version). Music sets up the mood, singing provokes more emotion than talking, there is the chance to hear multiple views at once. Music can even supplant words. It was a heartfelt argument, but I didn't need convincing anyway.
avatar
misery guts
Admin

Posts : 5677
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 40
Location : Lancashire, NW England

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Music television

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 8 of 11 Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum